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Planning Home Improvements? Here’s How to Net Enormous Savings

Planning Home Improvements? Here’s How to Net Enormous Savings

If you’re like most homeowners, you’d rather not postpone your home improvements. You might’ve already prepared your tools and materials or reviewed details with a contractor. Everything is in its proper place, and you’re set to move forward with a drill and a dream.

While enthusiasm and readiness are both positive qualities, there’s a strategy to home renovations that will net you enormous savings if you’re in the know. Though it requires patience and adaptability, scheduling your plans around the seasons is the best way to manage your money and still get the renovations you want.

In this article, we’ll describe some of the finer points of that strategy. We’ll offer a concise guide on the best times of the year to invest in certain home improvements, from the optimal months to purchase certain materials to job-specific details. As the numbers show, sometimes it pays to delay.

Winter

In late winter, shop for paint — many manufacturers lower their prices around that time of year. If you put off your interior painting projects, you’ll enjoy deals you won’t find during other seasons. As long as these adjustments don’t interfere with other plans, the wait is well worth it.

You’ll also benefit from moving your bathroom and kitchen remodeling projects to winter. With a broader selection of contractors and an increase in available materials, you can organize a cost-effective plan that fits within the limitations of your budget. All it takes is foresight.

Spring

Water damage often results in costly repairs, but these expenses are easy to avoid if a proactive homeowner makes the right improvements. You should use early spring to inspect your gutter system before the rain begins to fall, checking for clogged leader pipes. Consider contacting a professional.

You should have your air conditioning checked by a technician, as well, and pay for the necessary maintenance. These are simple precautions, but they’re essential to your comfort. If your AC breaks down in the height of summer, you could have difficulty finding a specialist quickly and for a decent price.

Summer

Summer is an excellent season to purchase new windows for installation, as many manufacturers reduce their prices in June and July. You’ll also find that many other home improvement tools and supplies see substantial discounts in June, making it an excellent month for stocking up on materials.

To make the most of summer, you should also schedule maintenance for your furnace and chimney. It’s a responsibility many homeowners procrastinate on, leaving many of them struggling to find a professional at the last minute. Get ahead of the rush, so you don’t run into the same trouble.

Fall

If you intend to paint your home, plan your project for fall. The college students companies often hire for their summer work have returned to school for the semester, and you’re more likely to receive help from an experienced painter who won’t make amateur mistakes.

You should also use fall to assess and address the drafts in your home. Move from room to room with a lit candle or stick of incense to see where the smoke moves. If you notice a leak, seal it with caulk or weatherstripping. This preventative measure will secure your comfort come winter.

Wait to Renovate

More often than not, you’ll save on materials and labor in postponing your projects. You’ll find that winter, spring, summer and fall each have distinct advantages that will help you mitigate costs. With this in mind, review your current plans to see if you would benefit from a rearrangement.

To rephrase a familiar expression, timing is money.

• Holly Welles is a real estate writer and the editor behind her own blog, The Estate Update. She loves helping readers figure out how to utilize the real estate market for their own financial benefit. You can catch more curated advice on her Twitter feed @HollyAWelles. Keep scrolling down to read more of Holly’s advice on Money & Markets.